• JP brings together several critical factors in the development of an effective school.

  • JP Associates offers our sites grant writing assistance. Take advantage of our experience writing successful grant requests.

  • JP works with schools providing training on how to ameliorate teacher weaknesses brought to light through the process of teacher evaluation.

  • Common Core State Standards, Factors Influencing Student Achievement, Responsive Coaching, Teacher Evaluation, Autism

  • JP partners with schools and districts across the country to provide intensive professional development for scientifically-based programs.
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U.S. at Risk of Not Reaching 90 Percent Graduation Rate Goal by 2020

Grad Nation report highlights how equity gaps are hindering progress; Responds to questions of skepticism

 (PRNewsfoto/GradNation Campaign)

 

Since 2001, 2.8 million more students have graduated from high school rather than dropping out. In an economy that prizes educational attainment more than ever before, these rising rates have created enormous benefits for individuals, communities and our entire nation. But even now with the current national graduation rate at 83.2 percent, it is becoming more evident that the nation will be unable to meet its high school graduation rate goal without intensifying efforts to reach the students who have historically faced the greatest challenges.  The country remains off-pace to reaching its goal for the second year in a row. 

Key Findings. The Building a Grad Nation report is based on the most recent comprehensive data from the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education (2014-15).  A close look at the data shows disparities in graduation rates in five key areas:

  • Low-income students
  • Black and Hispanic/Latino Students
  • Students with disabilities
  • English Language Learners
  • Low-Graduation-Rate High Schools

Learn More

Young Adult Novels That Teach a Growth Mindset

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Use these novels to teach learning from loss and overcoming adversity to your middle schoolers and high school freshmen.

The following books feature protagonists of diverse backgrounds and races, many of whom reappear in compelling sequels that reinforce the initial lessons and keep students hungry for more. While these young adult books are typically middle school level, their resonant subject matter, complex characters, profound themes, vivid vocabulary, and historical contexts make them suitable as enriched reading for elementary students and as a bridge for high school freshmen.

Don’t let the youth of the protagonists fool you: All of these books are worthy of serious study—and they invite multiple readings.

View the list of books and descriptions

10 Ways to Teach With The Times Today

How can teaching with The Times help you connect history, literature, science and civics to the world today?  How can your students become better readers, writers and thinkers by developing a regular news habit?

This webinar, an introduction to wealth of resources on NYTimes.com, will focus on practical ideas for using any day's Times to teach cross-curricular skills, from writing argumentative essays to analyzing infographics.

And in an era of "fake news," participants will also hear from an award-winning Times journalist, political reporter Nicholas Confessore, about how he develops, fact-checks and writes (real) news stories -- and why that process is so important.

Join us April 26, 2017 at 4pm ET.

 

Register Here

Anatomy of School Bullying

An illustration of a school campus with bubbles holding percentages over different areas of the school showing where bullying occurs.

 

Understanding the hot spots within schools is essential to putting a stop to student bullying.

Hallways and stairwells are bullying hot spots, according to a new report from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). In the 2014–15 academic year, students between the ages of 12 and 18 reported nearly twice as many bullying incidents in transitional areas between classes—where they spend a fraction of their time—as in other school areas like cafeterias or playgrounds.

About 5 percent of students faced overtly physical forms of bullying, reporting that they had been “pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on.” Students reported higher levels of verbal and relational bullying, disclosing that they have been “made fun of, called names, or insulted” (13 percent) or were the “subject of rumors” (12 percent). The numbers suggest that digital bullying, which seemed to herald a dangerous new era of harassment when it first appeared, has not developed as predicted. While bullied girls reported online harassment (15.9 percent) at more than twice the rate boys did, they still encountered far more harassment in school environments than digital ones. Only 6.1 percent of bullied boys reported online incidents.

But it’s the location data that jumps off the page of the report.

Learn more

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